Fore-edge Painting [...]

Some books have paintings which can only be seen when the pages are shifted slightly.

According to Carter, fore-edge painting can refer to any decoration found on the fore-edge of a book. Carter goes on to say “The term is most commonly used, however, for an English technique quite widely practiced in the second half of the 17th century in London and Edinburgh, and popularized in the 18th by John Brindley and (in particular) Edwards of Halifax, whereby the fore-edge of the book, very slightly fanned out and then held fast, is decorated with painted views or conversation pieces. The edges are then squared up and gilded in the ordinary way, so that the painting remains concealed (and protected) while the book is closed: fan out the edges and it reappears.” (Source)

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